Suspicion (1941)

Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine star in Alfred Hitchcocks suspenseful tale of a young wife who begins to suspect that her husband is going to kill her for her life insurance.

At first everything seems perfect; a whirlwind courtship between shy young Lina (Fontaine) and debonair Johnny (Grant). It soon becomes apparent that Johnny is a compulsive gambler and spendthrift. After embezzling in order to gamble Johnny becomes desperate. Then when a business deal goes down the drain, he becomes fascinated with the idea of a perfect murder.

Dial ‘M’ for Murder (1954)

A jealous husband (Ray Milland) finds out that his beautiful and wealthy young wife (Grace Kelly) is having romantic feelings for a writer (Robert Cummings). So, he devises a plot to have her murdered. When the perfect murder goes awry, in a chilling turn of events that only director Alfred Hitchcock could capture, it’s riveting suspense until the end.

1hr. 45min.

My Favorite Brunette (1947)

Bob Hope stars as Ronnie Jackson; a baby photographer who longs to be a private eye.  Through a mix-up, he is thought to be just that by beautiful Carlotta (Dorothy Lamour), who hires Ronnie to help her find her uncle.  What seems to be a case of missing persons, quickly escalates into a wild “cat and mouse” caper, with the likes of knife throwing Peter Lorre and strong man Lon Chaney, Jr.

1hr. 28min.

Gaslight (1944)

When lovelorn Paula (Ingrid Bergman) is swept off her feet by dashing Gregory (Charles Boyer), it seems as if she is going to have the happy ending that she has yearned for ever since the murder of her aunt many years before.  Then Gregory insists they move back into Paula’s aunts home and things begin to change.  Soon Paula is hearing strange noises and the gaslight is flickering ominously.  Is she losing her mind? Or is there something more sinister going on.  Joseph Cotton and 18 year old Angela Lansbury (making her film debut) co-star in this suspenseful mystery.

This film would win for Best Actress (Ingrid Bergman) and Best Art Direction – Black & White.

1hr. 54min.

Spellbound (1945)

When young up-and-coming pychiatrist Constance (Ingrid Bergman) meets Dr. Anthony (Gregory Peck) she is immediatly drawn to him. As their romance blossoms Constance begins to notice somthing is not quite right with Anthony.  The more she questions him she begins to realizes he’s not only, not who he seems to be, but he doesn’t have any memory of who he is.  It’s an intriguing psychological mystery that unfolds as the two race to solve a murder and solve the riddles of the human mind.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock, this film won the Academy Award for Best Score and features the intense dream sequence by Salvador Dali.

1hr. 51min.

Charade (1963)

When charming stranger Peter Joshua (Cary Grant) meets beautiful and equally charming Regina “Reggie” Lambert (Audrey Hepburn) there is an immediate attraction.  There’s just one little complication, her husband has just died mysteriously and there are three dangerous men after something that he had and they’re positive he gave it to Reggie.  Peter and Reggie must get to the bottom of the mystery while evading the three men, but Peter might not be who he says he is.

Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn were finally teamed in this film that has been called, “the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made”.

1hr. 53min.